Facts

In our undergraduate majors, students get the same personal attention from faculty they would at a small liberal-arts college.
  • Eight new faculty have joined MEAS since 2008
  • The new president of the American Meteorological Society is an MEAS alumnus
  • Recent MEAS discoveries
    • oyster larvae respond to ambient marine sound
    • a stone-ax found in Crete is more than 130,000 years old
    • old abandoned millponds add pollution to modern streams
    • surface coal mining pollutes the air
    • harmful algal blooms (red tides) can be predicted
    • how tornadoes get their spin
    • the first 3D images of falling snowflakes
    • weather information can be used to predict meningitis outbreaks in Africa
    • Superstorm Sandy would be stronger if it occurred in a future climate
  • More than 95 percent of MEAS graduate degree recipients find employment in their fields or go on for further graduate study
  • MEAS hosts the nation’s largest program in geoscience education
  • MEAS geology students go on a fall-break field trip every year — this year to Zion National Park in Utah
  • MEAS Prof. Matt Parker took graduate students into the field for severe storm campaigns: VORTEX2 and PECAN
  • MEAS research funding has increased in each of the past 5 years, with an overall increase of 40 percent since 2010
  • MEAS faculty and students use the worlds fastest supercomputers to model the Earth system
  • Since 2010 the number of students in MEAS overall has increased by 12 percent, the number of geology majors has tripled
  • MEAS geology Professor Ron Fodor is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America
  • MEAS meteorology Professor Gary Lackmann won the American Meteorological Society’s Lorenz Teaching Excellence Award in 2014
  • Four MEAS faculty have received National Science Foundation Career Awards