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Crickard, Keaveney Earn Goldwater Scholarships

The University Fellowships Program is pleased to announce that Ashley Crickard and Caleb Keaveney have received the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship.

The Goldwater Scholarship Program, named for former U.S. Senator Barry M. Goldwater, is one of the oldest and most prestigious scholarships in the fields of natural sciences, engineering and mathematics. Recipients are college sophomores and juniors who demonstrate the following:

  • Strong commitment to a research career in the natural sciences, mathematics and engineering
  • Academic excellence in these fields
  • Strong potential for significant future contributions to research in their chosen field

Recipients must be nominated by their academic institution in order to be considered for the Goldwater Scholarship. This year, more than 1,200 students were nominated for consideration, with 410 ultimately selected for the award. The scholarship provides up to $7,500 a year to help recipients cover costs associated with tuition, mandatory fees, books, room and board.

This year’s recipient selection brings the total number of Goldwater Scholars at NC State to 64. 

Meet this year’s awardees:

Ashley Crickard

Ashley Crickard
Ashley Crickard

How do you plan to use the scholarship funds?

“The Goldwater Scholarship will aid in funding my last year of undergraduate education. This will allow me to spend more time on my research and applying to graduate schools.”

What motivated you to apply for the Goldwater Scholarship and what does it mean to you to receive it?

“I have been involved in research since my freshman year. Research has always been an elemental part of my college pursuits. Receiving the Goldwater Scholarship means a lot. It is a national level award and validates that my efforts for advancing the mechanical engineering field have not gone unnoticed. Through the Goldwater community I have also been connected with like-minded peers and mentors to help motivate me in my research pursuits.”

What is your field of study/degree and what do you hope to do after graduation?

“I am majoring in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Biology. After graduation, I will continue to graduate school researching the sustainability of mechanical systems.”

Do you have any advice for students who are thinking of applying to programs like the Goldwater Scholarship?

“If one thoroughly enjoys their field of study, I always advise on looking into research opportunities during their first year. Research has helped me learn so much more about engineering principles than I could have learned in the classroom. Apply yourself in the classroom and participate in research, and one should be competitive for a multitude of different scholarships. Most importantly, go for it! Do not be the one to tell yourself no, take risks and have fun!”

Caleb Keaveney

Caleb Keaveney
Caleb Keaveney with a life-size model of the Galileo spacecraft at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he is an intern. 

How do you plan to use the scholarship funds?

“The scholarship funds will help cover the cost of my senior year.”

What motivated you to apply for the Goldwater Scholarship and what does it mean to you to receive it?

“Like any other scholarship, a lot of what motivated me to apply for the Goldwater was the financial reward, in addition to the satisfaction and validation that comes along with being recognized in that way. Goldwater in particular rewards those who exhibit a promising future in scientific research, and as an aspiring scientist with some unique experiences in research, I thought I might make a good candidate.”

What is your field of study/degree and what do you hope to do after graduation?

“I am a double major in meteorology and applied mathematics, but my research field is planetary science. I study the atmosphere of Jupiter, trying to figure out why the planet looks and behaves the way it does using satellite observations from NASA’s Juno mission and meteorological modeling. After graduating, I plan to pursue a Ph.D. in planetary science with a focus on atmospheres, and hopefully continue to support planetary exploration missions in the future.”

Do you have any advice for students who are thinking of applying to programs like the Goldwater Scholarship?

“The most important thing is to be wholly and authentically passionate about what you are doing and believe it is important. If you love what you do and you think it is worth sharing, channel that into your application and let it shine!”

This post was originally published in DASA.